WESTERN AUSTRALIAN MUSEUM

Perth Cultural Centre, James Street, Perth, Western Australia 6000
Written By Aubrey Whymark 2017
The Western Australian Museum in Perth has one of the largest meteorite collections in Australia. They have an amazing tektite display as well! These displays are from the old, now closed, museum. They've produced a fantastic little booklet called 'Tektites' by Ken McNamara and Alex Bevan.

The museum has now closed, but is expected to re-open in 2020.
  1. Managing Director
  2. Managing Director
  3. Managing Director

Website

​You can find the museum by clicking on the link below:

The Tektite Collection

Please click on the gallery below to view all the images.
  1. Managing Director
  2. Managing Director
  3. Managing Director
  4. Managing Director
  5. Managing Director
  6. Managing Director
  7. Managing Director
  8. Managing Director
  9. Managing Director
  10. Managing Director
  11. Managing Director
  12. Managing Director
  13. Managing Director
  14. Managing Director
  15. Managing Director
  16. Managing Director
  17. Managing Director
  18. Managing Director
  19. Managing Director
  20. Managing Director
  21. Managing Director
  22. Managing Director
  23. Managing Director
  24. Managing Director
  25. Managing Director
  26. Managing Director
  27. Managing Director
  28. Managing Director
  29. Managing Director
  30. Managing Director
  31. Managing Director
  32. Managing Director
  33. Managing Director
  34. Managing Director
  35. Managing Director
  36. Managing Director
  37. Managing Director
  38. Managing Director
  39. Managing Director
  40. Managing Director
  41. Managing Director
  42. Managing Director

Buttons, lack thereof

I was told that, surprisingly, the Western Australian Museum does not own a complete flanged button. They certainly have casts. I'm not sure if this is true or not, but I think someone should bequeath their buttons to the museum!
 
ABOVE: Tektites deserve displays like this! The impact crater is Wolfe Creek, unrelated to the tektite fall, but graphically showing where tektites come from, in the absence of a known (and much larger) source crater in Indochina.
ABOVE: The biggest tektite in Australia. Imagine the energy involved - this tektite was flung an estimated 5,800 km from the yet to be discovered impact site. Unsurprisingly, some of the smallest tektites are known from Port Campbell where superbly preserved tektites show practically zero signs of etching.
ABOVE: A broad-oval flanged button from between the rivers Darling and Murray, NSW, Australia was presented to Charles Darwin by Sir Thomas Mitchell. It could have been during Mitchell's visit to England in 1837 that he gave the Australite to Darwin. Mitchell may have found it on the sandy plains in 1835 or 1836. However, the WA Museum states that it was found in 1939. Charles Darwin wrote about the 'obsidian bomb' in 'Geological Observations...' in 1844. This specimen is a cast. The original is in the Natural History Museum, London (now displayed).
ABOVE: A great image. If you read this webpage then you already know what these show! The tektite on the left exhibits coarse V-grooving (also sometimes termed Anda-type sculpture and also the same as Moldavite Besednice sculpture). V-grooving occurs on the original posterior (back) surface due to ground-etching related to tension stresses formed during the rapid primary solidification from the outside-in. Note the slightly sigmoidal nature of these V-grooves. Read Cleverly, 1986, for more information and images on these etched tektites. The tektite on the right shows U-grooving in an Australite, U-grooving is also commonly found in Philippinites. U-grooving forms due to ground-etching and relates to lines of weakness caused by re-entry thermal shell loss and is found on the anterior (front) of the tektite. A poor navel is also evident on this specimen with U-grooves emanating from it. Van Koenigswald, 1961b, saw these features in Javanese tektites (they also occur in Philippinites) and termed them "drop marks". Van Koenigswald assumed these features formed by "drops" striking the surface. This is clearly not the case - these etched lines of weakness are in some way related to shell loss.
ABOVE: Everyone should own a copy of this superb booklet. It very simply explains what tektites are, with some great pictures. When I was perhaps 16 years old +/- I sent some money to the WA Museum and Alex Bevan was kind enough to send me a copy.

Powerpoint Presentation

PDF Presentation to download:

You can expand the presenation if viewing on a PC (bottom right icon)
Download

The Meteorite Collection

I know that many tektite collectors also love meteorites, even I have been known to dabble every now and again! Here are the meteorites in the Western Australian Museum. Please download the PDF if you wish to view everything.
  1. Managing Director
  2. Managing Director
  3. Managing Director
  4. Managing Director
  5. Managing Director
  6. Managing Director
  7. Managing Director
  8. Managing Director
  9. Managing Director
  10. Managing Director
  11. Managing Director
  12. Managing Director
  13. Managing Director
  14. Managing Director

Powerpoint Presentation

PDF Presentation to download:

You can expand the presenation if viewing on a PC (bottom right icon)
Download